League of Intrapreneurs Cubicle Warriors Toolkit

Action Plans

Step 1: Brainstorm

Step 2: SMART Goals

Step 3: Outline Actionable Items

Step 4: Implement

Examples of Completed Action Plans

Step 1: Brainstorm EXAMPLE

Step 2: SMART Goals EXAMPLE

Step 3: Outline Actionable Items EXAMPLE

Step 4: Implement EXAMPLE

Session One: Sustainability Is Everyone’s Business

The Necessary Revolution (2008) by Peter M. Senge, Joe Laur, Bryan Smith, Nina Kruschwitz, and Sara Schley

(from Powell’s) Brimming with inspiring stories from around the globe, The Necessary Revolution shows that ordinary people at every level within an organization have the ability and innovative spirit to do extraordinary things that can result in unprecedented solutions in an intensely interdependent world.

Systems Thinking: A Cautionary Tale, a video by Sustainability Illustrated

This video tells the story of “Operation Cat Drop” that occurred in Borneo in the 1950’s to illustrate the importance of systems thinking in a simple and engaging way. It is a reminder that when we don’t understand the inter-relatedness of things, solutions often cause more problems and simple questions often require complex and reflective thinking if good solutions are to be found.

The Ecology of Commerce, revised edition by Paul Hawken

(from Powell’s) The world has changed in the seventeen years since the controversial initial publication of Paul Hawken’s Ecology of Commerce, a stirring treatise about the perceived antagonism between ecology and business. Yet Hawken’s impassioned argument—that business both causes the most egregious abuses of the environment and, crucially, holds the most potential for solving our sustainability problems—is more relevant and resonant than ever. Containing updated and revised material for a new audience, The Ecology of Commerce presents a compelling vision of the restorative (rather than destructive) economy we must create.

Business Case for Sustainability, a video by Sustainability Illustrated

Relying on research by Bob Willard, this video presents the business case for sustainability and reliable evidence that quantifies the value of a company integrating sustainability into its corporate DNA.

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things (2002) by William McDonough and Michael Braungart

(from Powell’s) “Reduce, reuse, recycle” urge environmentalists; in other words, do more with less in order to minimize damage. As William McDonough and Michael Braungart argue in their provocative, visionary book, however, this approach perpetuates a one-way, “cradle to grave” manufacturing model that dates to the Industrial Revolution and casts off as much as 90 percent of the materials it uses as waste, much of it toxic. Why not challenge the notion that human industry must inevitably damage the natural world, they ask. In fact, why not take nature itself as our model? Elaborating their principles from experience (re)designing everything from carpeting to corporate campuses, the authors make an exciting and viable case for change.

Sustainability Illustrated

Sustainability Illustrated offers engaging videos to learn about and teach sustainable development. Their goal is to change the world by making the best sustainability knowledge out there available for free in a short and engaging video format. Sustainability Illustrated is a project of AM Creative INC.

Schumacher Center for a New Economics

The Schumacher Center for a New Economics educates the public about an economics that supports both people and the planet. They believe that a fair and sustainable economy is possible and that citizens working for the common interest can build systems to achieve it. They recognize that the environmental and equity crises we now face have their roots in the current economic system.  The Schumacher Center for a New Economics combines theoretical research on economics with practical application, deliberately focusing on transformative systems and the principles that guide them.

The Story Factor by Annette Simmons

(from Powell’s) Over one hundred stories drawn from the front lines of business and government, as well as myths, fables, and parables from around the world, illustrate how story can be used to persuade, motivate, and inspire in ways that cold facts, bullet points, and directives can’t. These stories, combined with practical storytelling techniques, show anyone how to become a more effective communicator. From “”who I am” to “I-know-what-you’re thinking,” Simmons identifies the six stories you need to know how to tell and demonstrates how they can be applied. This revised edition offers a guide to using storytelling in specific business circumstances, including corporate reorganizations, layoffs, and diversity issues.

Taking Action: Materials and Waste Check Lists

Use these check lists to take immediate action on materials use and waste in your organization.

League of Intrapreneurs

Social intrapreneurs are becoming key actors in the race towards a new economy. These corporate and institutional changemakers are developing scalable solutions to some of our most intractable problems from health to education to environment. But unlike social entrepreneurs, they are innovating from within business, governments and non-profits everywhere. The League of Intrapreneurs is a global action learning community that supports institutional innovators. They work to unlock the human potential and organizational assets inside our most powerful institutions to create positive impact in the world.

 

Session Two: Framing Sustainability

Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial Revolution by Paul Hawken, Amory Lovins, and Hunter Lovins

(from the publisher) Based on the principle that businesses can be good for the environment, Natural Capitalism shows how leading-edge companies are practicing a new type of industrialism that is both more efficient and more profitable, while simultaneously protecting the planet and creating jobs. Natural capitalism is a way of thinking that seeks to apply market principles to all sources of material value, most importantly natural resources. The authors have two related goals: first, to show the vast array of ecologically smart options available to businesses; second, to argue that it is possible for society and industry to adopt them.

Natural Capitalism, a video by Sustainability Illustrated

Natural capitalism is illustrated in the video with two examples: the collapse of the Atlantic Northwest cod fishery between 1950 and 1992 as well as an example of what accounting for natural capital would look like in the process of making clothes such as jeans.

Rethinking Progress: The Circular Economy, a video by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation

There’s a world of opportunity to re-think and re-design the way we make stuff. ‘Re-Thinking Progress’ explores how through a change in perspective we can re-design the way our economy works – designing products that can be ‘made to be made again’ and powering the system with renewable energy. It questions whether with creativity and innovation we can build a restorative economy. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation works in education, business innovation and analysis to accelerate the transition to a circular economy.

Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things (2002) by William McDonough and Michael Braungart

(from Powell’s) “Reduce, reuse, recycle” urge environmentalists; in other words, do more with less in order to minimize damage. As William McDonough and Michael Braungart argue in their provocative, visionary book, however, this approach perpetuates a one-way, “cradle to grave” manufacturing model that dates to the Industrial Revolution and casts off as much as 90 percent of the materials it uses as waste, much of it toxic. Why not challenge the notion that human industry must inevitably damage the natural world, they ask. In fact, why not take nature itself as our model? Elaborating their principles from experience (re)designing everything from carpeting to corporate campuses, the authors make an exciting and viable case for change.

Triple Bottom Line and Sustainability, a video by Sustainability Illustrated

In this video Alexandre Magnin suggests a new look at the triple bottom line viewed through the lens of science. This provides businesses with new perspective on the rationale for integrating sustainability into who and how they are in the world.

BCorporation.net

B Corps are for-profit companies certified by the nonprofit B Lab to meet rigorous standards of social and environmental performance, accountability, and transparency. Today, there is a growing community of more than 1,600 Certified B Corps from 42 countries and over 120 industries working together toward 1 unifying goal: to redefine success in business.

GRI

GRI is an international independent organization that helps businesses, governments and other organizations understand and communicate the impact of business on critical sustainability issues such as climate change, human rights, corruption and many others.

The Natural Step

The Natural Step is a nonprofit organization, passionate about helping businesses and communities succeed in creating a sustainable world. Since 1989, The Natural Step has worked with thousands of corporations, municipalities, academic institutions and not-for-profit organizations that have proven that moving strategically toward sustainability leads to new opportunities, reduced costs and dramatically reduced ecological and social impacts. With twenty-five years of experience helping organizations and individuals understand and make meaningful progress toward sustainability, The Natural Step has 10 regional offices and local entry points on nearly every continent.

Session Three: The Power of One

Forbes Insight article “Global Diversity and Inclusion: Fostering Innovation Through a Diverse Workforce.”

Forbes Insights conducts primary research designed to support both strategic and tactical decisions for business executives.

Van Jones and Tom Steyer on the Business Opportunity of Including All, a video by GreenBiz

The majority of the country now agrees that climate change is a problem and we’ve got to address it. At Verge 2015, two champions of the movement — philanthropist business leader Tom Steyer, who founded NexGen Climate, and Van Jones, founder of the Dreams Corp., Green For All and a former White House advisor — talked together about the huge opportunity to not only stem climate change through renewable energy innovation, but also address income inequality.

A New Psychology for Sustainability Leadership: The Hidden Power of Ecological Worldviews by Steve Schein, PhD

(from the publisher) Schein explores the psychological motivations of sustainability leaders and shows how they relate to overall effectiveness and capacity to lead transformational change. By empirically grounding key theories from developmental psychology in sustainability leadership practice, the author encourages us to think about leadership in a different way and explores how the complexity of sustainability is driving new approaches to leadership.

Simon Sinek: How Great Leaders Inspire Action

In this TED Talk, Simon Sinek offers a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership — starting with a golden circle and the question “Why?” His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers.

 

Session Four: Work from the Inside Out

Tom Wujec: Got a Wicked Problem? First, Tell Me How You Make Toast

Making toast doesn’t sound very complicated — until someone asks you to draw the process, step by step. Tom Wujec loves asking people and teams to draw how they make toast, because the process reveals unexpected truths about how we can solve our biggest, most complicated problems at work. In this TED Talk, learn how to run this exercise yourself, and hear Wujec’s surprising insights from watching thousands of people draw toast.

The City of Portland’s Sustainability at Work 

Sustainability at Work was formed in 2007 as a solution for businesses lacking in time, budget and expertise and who want to improve their environmental practices. The program’s services have been informed by national and local research, input from hundreds of Portland businesses and by the technical expertise of their partners. Since its launch, the program has helped thousands of Portland businesses advance green initiatives in the workplace—from small start-ups and nonprofits to large corporations.

Action Plan Step 1: Brainstorm

Action Plan Step 2: SMART Goals

Action Plan Step 3: Outline Actionable Items

Action Plan Step 4: Implement

Connect, Reflect, Act

Sustainability Works Evaluation